Tools for Skeptical Thinking: Evaluating Science and Pseudoscience in Speech-Language Pathology

Uploaded: February 6, 2017 |  0 Comments  | 

Clinicians frequently encounter new therapy procedures or products that appear to be more effective than the ones we currently use. Often these are heavily marketed, and the promoters promise remarkable successes that we and the clients have been hoping for. These products are on social media on the internet, we hear about them from colleagues, and we attend CEU events that encourage their use. But how do we determine if these procedures are actually based on science, or if they are really a form of pseudoscience? How do we remain appropriately skeptical so we don’t fall for quackery and accept things without question? This presentation will help participants learn how to evaluate claims being made about products and procedures so that we select only methods that are evidence and science based. Various examples from autism, voice, language, and speech sound disorders will be provided to practice our skeptical thinking. This will include a deep evaluation of the logic, theory and evidence against the use of nonspeech oral motor exercises (NSOME) to change speech sound productions in children.
a. Science Pseudoscience


Title of Training: Tools for Skeptical Thinking: Evaluating Science and Pseudoscience in Speech-Language Pathology
Presenter: Dr. Gregory. L. Lof
Training Date: 02/13/2017

Topic: Speech and Language


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